GABA

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GABA (Gamma-Aminobutryic Acid) is classified as a neurotransmitter; that is, a natural substance that helps nerve impulses cross synapses and communicate with one another.

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Description

GABA (Gamma-Aminobutryic Acid) is classified as a neurotransmitter; that is, a natural substance that helps nerve impulses cross synapses and communicate with one another.  In addition to its positive effect on the nervous system, medical studies have proven GABA to have many other important positive effects on the body following supplementation. GABA naturally stimulates the anterior pituitary gland to secrete higher levels of Human Growth Hormone (HGH), and as a result, has many powerful anti-aging properties.  GABA  improves sleep cycles leading to more restful sleeping and more interesting, vivid dreaming.  GABA has shown powerful stabilizing effects on blood pressure. Finally, research has demonstrated GABA to be a very effective analgesic, eliminating pain from chronic conditions such as arthritis and lower back pain.

Directions:  Take 1-3 capsules per day or as recommended by a health care professional. Pure GABA should be taken with vitamins and minerals.  Tyson’s MVM (Multivitamin) is highly recommended.  Powder equivalent is 1/4th level teaspoon for each capsule.

Key Benefits

 Helps regulate nerve function and promotes calmness in cases of manic behavior, schizophrenia, high blood pressure and epilepsy.
 Tranquilizing effect similar to medical tranquilizers but without addictive problems of these drugs.
 Sleep disorders. Because of tranquilizing properties of GABA, supplementation of 1 capsule prior to bedtime may be helpful in sleep deprived individuals.
 Low levels have been indicated in Epileptics and Essential Tremors (ET), which may benefit from supplementation with GABA.
 Stimulates release of prolactin hormone from the pituitary gland, which may help reduce enlarged prostate glands.

References

  • 290) Bieda, M.C. and MacIver, M.B. (2001) Propofol primarily targets GABA-gated chloride channels in hippocampal neurons.  Anesthesiology  (accepted).
  • 291) Bieda, M.C. and MacIver, M.B. (2001) Propofol actions on hippocampal CA 1 inhibitory interneurons. Soc. Neuroscience (accepted)
  • 289) Anderson, R.J., Hornung, B., Pittson, S., Monroe, F.A. and MacIver, M.B (2000)  Isoflurane blocks LTP of hippocampal CA1 neurons at concentrations that block recall during anesthesia.  Soc. Neuroscience, 26(1):1077 (#405.7).
  • 312) Nishikawa, K. and MacIver, M.B. (2000)  Halothane produces disinhibition by depressing inhibitory interneurons in rat hippocampal slices.  Soc. Neuroscience, 26(2):1393 (#522.10).
  • 313) Nishikawa, K. and MacIver, M.B.   (2000)  Membrane and synaptic actions of halothane on rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons. Anesthesiology 93(3A):A792.
  • 306) MacIver, B., Harrison, N., Hemmings, H., Weight, F., Pearce, R.  (2000)  Anesthetic Actions at GABA and Glutamate Synapses.  Winter Conference on Brain  Research, 33:60.
  • 310) Nishikawa, K. and MacIver, M.B. (1999) Anesthetic depression of NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory synaptic transmission.  Soc. Neuroscience, 25(2):1714.
  • 319) Rabinovici, G.D., Lukatch, H.S., Monroe, F.A. and MacIver, M.B. (1999)  Ischemic modulation of EEG activity in rat brain slices.  Soc. Neuroscience, 25(2):1865.
  • 316) Pittson, S. and MacIver, M.B. (1999) Synaptic sites of action for halothane and propofol.  Soc. Neuroscience, 25(2):2229.
  • 311) Nishikawa, K. and MacIver, M.B. (1999)  Effects of halothane on synaptic transmission mediated by NMDA receptors.  Anesthesiology 91(3A):A798.
  • 317) Pittson, S. and MacIver, M.B. (1999)  Halothane and propofol do not depress postsynaptic excitability in hippocampal neurons.  Anesthesiology 91(3A):A756.
  • 300) Himmel, A.M., Monroe, F.A. and MacIver, M.B. (1998) Anesthetic-induced depression caused by differing degrees of GABA enhancement.  Soc. Neuroscience, 24(1):101.
  • 293) Doze, V.A. and MacIver, M.B. (1998)  Halothane enhances presynaptic spontaneous GABA release by increasing calcium release from ryanodine sensitive stores. Soc. Neuroscience, 24(1):349.
  • 314) Pham, D.V., Himmel, A.M., Monroe, F.A. and MacIver, M.B. (1998)  Isoflurane depresses NMDA-mediated synapses via presynaptic mechanisms.  Anesthesiology, 89(3A):A724.
  • 301) Himmel, A.M., Monroe, F.A. and MacIver, M.B. (1998)  Differing degrees of GABA enhancement for the depressant effects of pentobarbital and  isoflurane.  Anesthesiology, 89(3A):A721.
  • 294) Doze, V.A., and MacIver, M.B. (1998)  Halothane acts on ryanodine sensitive calcium release channels to enhance GABA release.  Anesthesiology, 89(3A):A722.
  • 299) Himmel, A.M., Lukatch, H.S. and MacIver, M.B. (1997) Temperature effects on hippocampal and neocortical theta activity. Soc. Neuroscience, 23(2):1847.
  • 319) Rabinovici, G.D., Lukatch, H.S. and MacIver, M.B. (1997) Ischemia-induced EEG waveform alterations recorded from cortical brain slices. Anesthesiology , 87(3A):A688.
  • 292) Doze, V.A., Monroe, F.A. and MacIver, M.B. (1997) Halothane enhances presynaptic GABA release by increasing internal calcium. Anesthesiology , 87(3A):A626.
  • 307) MacIver, M.B. (1997) Anesthetic actions at GABA and glutamate synapses. Conference on Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Anaesthesia, 5:21.
  • 292) Doze, V.A. and MacIver, M.B. (1997) Halothane enhances presynaptic GABA release by increasing intracellular calcium. Conference on Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Anaesthesia, 5:50.
  • 308) MacIver, M.B. (1997) Excitation of inhibitory interneurons. Winter Conference on Brain Research, 30:31.
  • 315) Pittson, S. and M.B. MacIver (1996) Propofol actions on two forms of GABA-mediated inhibition in hippocampal CA1 neurons. Soc. Neuroscience, 22(2):1543.
  • 304) Lukatch, H.S. and M.B. MacIver (1996) Patch clamp and CDS analysis of cholinergic theta frequency oscillations in neocortical slices. Soc. Neuroscience, 22(2):1535.
  • 296) Doze, V.A., H.S. Lukatch, F.A. Monroe and M.B. MacIver(1996) Halothane enhances spontaneous GABA release. Soc. Neuroscience, 22(2):1543.
  • 315) Pittson, S., F.A. Monroe and M.B. MacIver (1996) Halothane enhances feedback, but not feedforward GABA inhibition. Anesthesiology, 85(3A):A674.
  • 305) Lukatch, H.S., V.A. Doze and M.B. MacIver (1996) Halothane prolongs GABA fast and slow inhibitory currents. Anesthesiology, 85(3A):A673.
  • 298) Hagan, C.E., R.A. Pearce, J.R. Trudell, and M.B. MacIver (1996) Calcium electrode measures aqueous volatile anesthetic concentrations. Anesthesiology, 85(3A):A684.
  • 295) Doze, V.A., H.S. Lukatch, F.A. Monroe and M.B. MacIver (1996) Volatile anesthetics enhance presynaptic GABA release. Anesthesiology, 85(3A):A706.
  • 302) Lukatch, H.S. and M.B. MacIver (1995) Glutamate and GABA in anesthetic-induced neocortical burst suppression activity in vitro. Soc. Neuroscience, 21(2):1566.
  • 321) Travis, V.L. and M.B. MacIver (1995) Propofol enhances GABAA,slow feedforward inhibition in CA 1 neuron dendrites. Anesthesiology, 83(3A):A751.
  • 309) Mikulec, A.A., S.M. Amagasu, F.A. Monroe and M.B. MacIver (1995) Three sites of action are necessary and sufficient for halothane – induced depression of hippocampal CA 1 neurons. Anesthesiology, 83(3A):A1266.
  • 303) Lukatch, H.S. and M.B. MacIver (1995) Propofol, thiopental and isoflurane-induced burst suppression EEG patterns are intrinsic to neocortex. Anesthesiology, 83(3A):A750.
  • 288) Amagasu, S.M., A.A. Mikulec, F.A. Monroe and M.B. MacIver (1995) Riluzole produces a potent, use-dependent depression of synaptic transmission in rat hippocampal CA 1 neurons. Anesthesiology, 83(3A):A745.

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